The Hour of the Star (Paperback)

By Clarice Lispector, Giovanni Pontiero (Translator), Ben Moser (Translator)
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Staff Reviews

Brazilian literary royalty, Lispector is probably best known to English readers for her wonderful final novel The Hour of the Star. Though that one is certainly the most quickly accessible novel, this one is my favorite. A slow-burning blend of Kafkan menace and non-Western mysticism, Lispector's depiction of a woman pushed to her psychological limits, and then what happens spiritually just beyond those limits, is profound in every way. Religiously and philosophically tinged fiction at its best. (Also, Idra Novey's new translation is a poetic joy.)

— From Brad


Narrated by the cosmopolitan Rodrigo S.M., this brief, strange, and haunting tale is the story of Macabea, one of life's unfortunates. Living in the slums of Rio and eking out a poor living as a typist, Macabea loves movies, Coca-Colas, and her rat of a boyfriend; she would like to be like Marilyn Monroe, but she is ugly, underfed, sickly and unloved. Rodrigo recoils from her wretchedness, and yet he cannot avoid the realization that for all her outward misery, Macabea is inwardly free/She doesn't seem to know how unhappy she should be. Lispector employs her pathetic heroine against her urbane, empty narrator edge of despair to edge of despair and, working them like a pair of scissors, she cuts away the reader's preconceived notions about poverty, identity, love and the art of fiction. In her last book she takes readers close to the true mystery of life and leave us deep in Lispector territory indeed.

About the Author

Clarice Lispector was born in 1920 to a Jewish family in western Ukraine. As a result of the anti-Semitic violence they endured, the family fledto Brazil in 1922, and Clarice Lispector grew up in Recife. Following the death of her mother when Clarice was nine, she moved to Rio de Janeiro with her father and two sisters, and she went on to study law. With her husband, who worked for the foreign service, she lived in Italy, Switzerland, England, and the United States, until they separated and she returned to Rio in 1959; she died there in 1977. Since her death, Clarice Lispector has earned universal recognition as Brazil's greatest modern writer.

Giovanni Pontiero (1932 1996) was the ablest translator of twentieth century literature in Portuguese and one of its most ardent advocates. He was the principal translator into English of the works of Jose Saramago and was awarded the Teixeira-Gomes Prize for his translation of The Gospel According to Jesus Christ.

Product Details
ISBN: 9780811219495
ISBN-10: 0811219496
Publisher: New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publication Date: November 9th, 2011
Pages: 128
Language: English