From the Internet's Many Worlds

1) From the world of the blogs . . .

Is there a better literary blog than the one put together by the Bay Area poet Tom Clark, Beyond the Pale? I'm not sure there is. Day in and day out, in his curated collection of photographs and excerpts, alongside his new poems and background notes set in the comments, something fresh and vital occurs. Very highly recommended you make this a regular stop. 

 

 

 

2) From the world of Twitter . . .

We've extolled the wonder of Teju Cole's Twitter feed before. Today, though, he managed to outdo himself. Over the course of 35 retweets he weaves together a story, complete with narrator and chorus, beginning and end. It is a thing to behold. It begins thus ... (oh, and remember, you have to read from the bottom up) ...

 

 

3) From the world of old media . . .

Michael Robbins waxes sonic about the joys of words made right -- you know the ones, that roll around the mouth and through the lips like Sam Beckett's pebbles -- in his gorgeous, rich contribution to the Chicago Tribune

"One can go too far. Many readers have felt that Lord Byron, Edgar Allan Poe, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Swinburne and Stein do, although I am not among their number (or, rather, their going so far is precisely what I love about them). Samuel Johnson could not abide Shakespeare's fondness for 'quibbles,' or puns (a special case of sound's enhancement of referentiality): 'A quibble is to Shakespeare, what luminous vapors are to the traveler,' leading him astray. ... [Wallace] Stevens occasionally poked fun at his own tendency to sonic boisterousness — 'Such tink and tank and tunk-a-tunk-tunk,' 'With his damned hoobla-hoobla-hoobla-how,' 'This trivial trope reveals a way of truth.'

"In the field of phonaesthetics, which exists, the phrase 'cellar door' is sometimes regarded as the most beautiful-sounding phrase in the English language, though no one can say by whom, exactly."